Viewpoint Exhibit History

Tuesday, September 10, 2013 to Friday, October 4, 2013

Viewpoint Photographic Art Center is pleased to present the exhibit Moods of Venice by Robert Hubbell in its Step Up Gallery in September.

“Ah, Venice, that magical place,” sighs Bob. “My romantic heart beat as I strolled her alleys and plazas. I enjoyed her architecture, the glories of her art, the dignified decay of her weathered buildings, the romance of her nights, and the exuberance of her past.”

In 2011 Bob spent two weeks in Venice, much of it simply wandering, trying to absorb and photograph what he saw. “Different aspects of the city generated different responses,” he says, “from the cliché of gondolas moored near San Marco Square to the giant billboard dominating the Bridge of Sighs. I was intrigued by reflections in the canals. Brightly colored like the billboard, they are reminiscent of Venice’s glory days, when whole buildings were covered with murals, and extravagance was a way of life. The twilight hours add still another mood to the city, as the colors become muted and the ghosts of the past begin to whisper.”

Tuesday, August 6, 2013 to Friday, September 6, 2013

In August, Viewpoint Photographic Art Center presents the photographs of Dale Crandall-Bear in an exhibition called Marking Time: A Journey through Ancient Lands.

“In the spring of 2008,” says Crandall-Bear, “I embarked on a long-anticipated journey into distant time. I sought an encounter with the ancient past – beyond the youth of my own country and beyond the ‘middle age’ of Europe. I found what I was looking for in the deserts of Egypt, in the back alleys of Damascus, and on the barren plains of Anatolia. The images in this exhibit are the photographic impressions of that journey.”

Tuesday, August 6, 2013 to Friday, September 6, 2013

During the month of August, Viewpoint Gallery presents Images of Indian Valley—Photographs by Erik Weber in the Step Up Gallery.

Erik Weber is a documentary photographer, or as he prefers to call himself, a "visual historian". After living most of his life in San Francisco, he moved to Indian Valley, a remote, secluded part of Plumas County, California, where logging, ranching, mining and farming has been the way of life from the time the valley was settled in the 1850s to the present. Minimally touched by outside influences, it offered Weber an opportunity to make images of a way of life much different from the one he had known.

Weber spent the first years in Indian Valley learning how to live in the mountains with few city conveniences and getting to know the local customs, folks and critters. With so much to photograph, and knowing the limits of his visual energy, he decided to to confine his photography to Indian Valley. He felt it was important to document what he found here before it disappeared.

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 to Friday, August 2, 2013

The annual Viewpoint Members’ Exhibit, a long-time tradition at Viewpoint, is always exciting for the quality and range of photographic art it showcases. Because it gives all Viewpoint members an opportunity to showcase one image of their choosing, the exhibit highlights the diversity of techniques, approaches, and personal visions in our photographic community.

 

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 to Friday, August 2, 2013

The annual Viewpoint Members’ Exhibit, a long-time tradition at Viewpoint, is always exciting for the quality and range of photographic art it showcases. Because it gives all Viewpoint members an opportunity to showcase one image of their choosing, the exhibit highlights the diversity of techniques, approaches, and personal visions in our photographic community.

 

Tuesday, June 4, 2013 to Friday, July 5, 2013

In June, Viewpoint Photographic Art Center presents in its main gallery the photographs of László Bencze in an exhibition titled Onsite: Men of Mining.

“Mining companies get a bad rap in the press,” says László. “No one wants a mine in their back yard. On the other hand everyone wants computers, TV sets, cars, cameras, washing machines, cell phones and all the other good stuff of modern culture. And just about all of that good stuff begins life somewhere in the ground.

“The people of mining work hard, safe, and honorably, taking pains to cause as little damage to the environment as possible and remediating that which is inevitable. I have enjoyed my assignments onsite and have come to admire these dedicated workers, craftsmen, and artisans who transform dirt into the raw material of civilization.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013 to Friday, July 5, 2013

Viewpoint Photographic Art Center presents the exhibit Ancient Textures of the Sevier Orogeny by Viewpoint member Ron Williams in the Step Up Gallery in June.

The Sevier Orogeny was a mountain-forming event that affected North America along the western slope of the Rocky Mountains during the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. Sevier refers to the Sevier River, whose headwaters originate in the Zion National Park region. Millions of years of tectonic action, erosion of carving rivers, volcanic episodes, and glacial scraping have created these fascinating surreal landscapes. “This body of work,” says Ron, “focuses on the hidden beauty in close-ups of textures in the geologic detail”. Very little photo manipulation was applied to these images shot along Highway 9 just east of the Mt. Carmel Tunnel in Zion National Park.

Wednesday, January 9, 2013 to Saturday, February 2, 2013

In January, Viewpoint Gallery honors Gene Kennedy with a retrospective exhibition that he intriguingly calls 44 Years of Real Estate Photographs.

“For many years, I have struggled to find a single phrase that describes what I do photographically,” Kennedy states. “From nature photography to landscape photography to architectural photography to environmental documentary photography to humorous photography to Gladding McBean photography — nothing covers it all. Recently, as I turned my career energies in a new direction ... I stumbled onto that elusive phrase.”

 

Wednesday, May 6, 2009 to Friday, June 5, 2009

How do visual images convey a sense of place? From the jungles of the Amazon rainforest to the icy glaciers of Antarctica to the festive streets of Venice, three Viewpoint photographers define place through color, form and gesture.

Larry Brenden brings us a world that few have experienced: Antarctica, a continent completely surrounded by ocean with a desert climate which receives less than 3 inches of precipitation annually. "Though isolated by geography, the Antarctic continent is not isolated from the ravages of Global Warming and water conservation. This environment, one of the last pristine frontiers, is extremely vulnerable to our daily decisions about energy and waste." Many travelers expect white snow and black rocks; when in fact the clean air and unpolluted environment contribute to a kaleidoscope of colors.

Dolores Frank plunged into the festive world of the Venetian carnavale, an annual celebration with roots in many traditions, from the Latin feast of Saturnalia to the Greek feast of Dionysian cults celebrating the start of spring. "People come from all over the world to display their extravagant costumes and masks. For those who choose not to adorn themselves, there are many celebrations planned which show the heart of Venice. It is a happy time with thousands of people celebrating."

David L. Robertson explored a slice of the Brazilian rainforest in 2007, venturing upriver in canoes around the town of Manaus. "In the villages, the houses would often contain a dozen or more occupants. At night, hammocks would be strung from hooks in the ceiling to accommodate all of the evening residents." Robertson came away from his experience with a renewed sense of the diversity of cultures around the world.

Three visual artists in three evocative settings. Join us for a visual exploration of place.

Viewpoint’s 4th annual December juried exhibition is Twelve: Square, a selection of photographs exploring the particular challenges and properties of the square format.

“I considered the use of the frame to be of utmost importance when curating this year’s Viewpoint exhibition,” writes exhibit juror Byron Wolfe, eminent photographer and Professor of Communication Design at California State University, Chico. “I looked for pictures where the photographer’s compositional approach recognized the unique properties of the square.”

“There’s something special about squares,” Wolfe observes. “At first, their perfect symmetry and equally measured sides convey stability and equilibrium, but as soon as you start to fill them up with things, their balance becomes delicate and tenuous. Suddenly, composing within a square is more akin to a man carefully poised on high-tension wire. Nudging subject matter around the edges of a square has the potential to create tension or energy, and the use of internal space in the square can create emphasis or a settled stability.”

Step Up Gallery at Viewpoint presents the work of Grass Valley photographer Frank Francis, whose focus is the people of remote countries around the world.

For the last 25 years, Frank Francis has had a consuming interest in photography. His work has its source in the remote reaches of the world, on extended trips to the mountains, deserts and rivers of Africa, India, the Middle East, the Himalayas, Mongolia and Myanmar. Traveling mostly alone, the goal has been to explore the places and people of those remote places and photograph that which is quickly passing.

 

 

 

"You shall enter the living shelter of the forest.
You shall walk where only the wind has walked before".
                                     – Nancy Newhall, 1959

Iconic symbols of majestic form, evocative of age and fortitude, trees solicit emotive responses. Whether provoking conservation movements, inspiring artistry, or simply impressing the viewer, they have historically symbolized strength, power, and beauty.  Growing in lush rainforests, chaparral woodlands, and mountainside rock outcroppings, trees in their myriad forms permeate many inhabited regions of the Earth, and consequently, are revered, studied and harvested.  And, their presence is recorded.  Tree: Observed presents visual interpretations by four American photographers working in distinct topographical and geographic regions.  From the East Coast to the country’s westernmost point of Hawaii, each photographer, employing his or her chosen photographic medium and technique, has eloquently interpreted these natural icons.

Viewpoint Photographic Art Center presents the work of Ivan Sohrakoff in the Step Up Gallery at Viewpoint during the month of August. A Woodland photographer, Sohrakoff has been photographing for 17 years but has been photographing color landscapes with a passion since late 2009. Sohrakoff’s exhibit is called “The Lines of Landscape.” From man-made bridges to natural rock formations, the lines of landscape guide our eyes around the world. Sometimes elegant, sometimes blunt, these lines can manifest themselves as obvious vanishing points or as subtle elements that help lead a viewer through the scene.

 

Viewpoint Gallery will present the work of Christopher Rauschenberg in an exhibition called Paris: Walking with Atget. For these photographs, Rauschenberg revisited Paris locations photographed by the French photographer Eugene Atget in the early 20th century, rephotographing the same views at the end of the 20th century to reveal what had changed and what had not. Paris: Walking with Atget includes 40 of Rauschenberg’s silver prints, many of them paired with copies of Atget’s original images.

 

Viewpoint Photographic Art Center proudly presents the work of Jon Sousa, a California photographer who shares for the first time one of four portfolios based on his travels in the States and abroad.  With thirty-five years of photography experience as a photo educator at the high school and community college level, as well as having owned and operated Jon Sousa Photography doing portrait work, Sousa now turns his attention to his personal vision. In this body of work, The Human Touch, Sousa’s images incorporate the relationship between his favorite model and evocative architectural settings. 

Fifteen North American photographers celebrate the new decade immersed in the remote cultures, ancient temple architecture, stunning landscapes, and UNESCO World Heritage sites of Cambodia and Myanmar, Southeast Asia’s second largest county (formerly known as Burma).  Under the direction of photographer and educator Rick Murai of Penn Valley, California, and in partnership with Myths and Mountains, each participant on this excursion captures unique and personal interpretations of urban and rural historical sites and cultural landmarks defining these Southeast Asian countries.  Phnom Penh, Cambodia’s politically charged capital, and Tuol Sleng Prison and the Killing Fields – sobering testaments to the Khmer Rouge – are visited, as is Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar.

 

 

Entries for Twelve: Parallels have been selected.  Congratulations to our winners and all the photographers whose work is in the exhibit, and a big Thank You to everyone who submitted images! The winners are:

1st Place: James Gilmore, Memory and Metaphor
2nd Place: Eric Baral, Cell Phone Diptych 2
3rd Place: Gordon Reynolds, Johns
Honorable Mention: Dan Herrera, The Carapace
Honorable Mention: Diane Tempest, Parallel Shoes
Honorable Mention: Roberta Neidigh, Five Trees

Viewpoint Gallery’s annual juried exhibit Twelve encourages photographers to interpret an idea suggested by the theme of the show. This year’s theme “Parallels” alludes to the year 2011 itself with its obvious numeric parallel. But it also invites photographers to conjure connections and relatedness within the photographic frame. Entries for Twelve: Parallels will contrast, compare, illuminate, suggest, capture, and express photographers' varied approaches to this theme. In addition to single images, Twelve: Parallels will feature multiple images in diptychs, triptychs and polyptychs.

Ten Eyes is a group of Sacramento women photographers who began meeting monthly in 1983 to show and critique each other’s work. Originally five in number, the group has grown to include more women who share a passion for creating photographic art. This exhibition is a collaborative effort to present images taken by each member of the Ten Eyes group of places visited and objects acquired during their travels.
       
The women of Ten Eyes exhibiting are:

Liz Welsh AbadDolores FrankVictoria Ruderman
Karen ConnellFrancine MoskovitzIlse Spivek
Anita Frimkess FeinShirley PlantJudy Yemma

 

Chris Kaufman's exhibit Military Moments documents the experiences of men and women in the armed forces, including Beale Air Force Base, and the communities that support them. “The service members of Beale and the surrounding community are passionate about the military, and it's important to give them a voice and tell their story."

Jeff Enlow’s project Behind the Levees is about the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, where California's two largest rivers meet. It's a place that exists in some distant past while being thrust into an uncertain future. Behind the Levees captures quiet spaces in the Delta where man and nature meet, at a time that may never exist like this again.

Hidden in remote areas of Nevada and adjacent states are beautiful rock engravings known as petroglyphs. They record the visions and dreams of ancient Native Americans. Many are thousands of years old, and most are completely unknown to the public; their existence has been kept secret to protect them from vandalism.

World renowned photographer John Wimberley spent ten years searching for these fragile, irreplaceable cultural treasures. During this time he visited more than 100 sites and exposed 5000 large format negatives. His stunning black and white photographs reveal the beauty and profound sacredness of shamanic images in stone.

Chris Schiller has been photographing the American West for over 20 years.  He seeks out places and views rarely or never photographed before. He uses his camera as another way to explore the places he visits, bringing his images a sense of discovery and delight. In this exhibit of superbly crafted images, Chris Schiller looks at the movement of water in all of its manifestations, both in the present and the past. 

Viewpoint Photographic Art Center presents the work of Keith Berger in the Step Up Gallery during the month of September. The exhibit is titled “Fleeting Impressions.” Keith Berger, a Viewpoint member, makes photographs of the wonders of nature, both large and small, and of coastal scenes and cityscapes. He has begun a series of photographic projects focusing on abstractions and reflections that view everyday scenes and objects in new ways.

Click here for complete auction details

The April exhibit showcases contributions to this year’s Fine Print Auction. Featured photographers include Howard Bond, Martha Casanave, Mark Citret, Richard Garrod, Kate Jordahl, Koichiro Kurita, C. Cameron Macauley, Richard Murai, Dianne Poinski, Merg Ross, Ryuijie, and John Wimberley. 

In addition to viewing this exhibit, visitors have the opportunity to purchase their favorite prints directly, or to cast a silent bid for their preferred photographs. The excitement culminates on the evening of May 1st, when attendees compete for favored prints to be acquired in true Auction style complemented with wine and hors d’œuvres.

In October, Viewpoint's 20th Year Celebration culminates with Vintage Contemporary: The Charter Members Show, an exhibit of work by many of the original members of Viewpoint Photographic Art Center. The Vintage Contemporary exhibit will showcase the work of over 50 charter members and celebrate Viewpoint's continuing role in the community. The title encourages artists to show older work created using traditional photographic media or current work in digital or alternative processes. In fact, some artists may choose to exhibit paintings, mixed media, video, or other media to reflect their ever-evolving artistic interests.

Viewpoint Gallery presents an exhibit of exceptional images by noted photographers David Gardner and Stephen Johnson, who both look closely at the Earth—its wild places and the influence of man.

For David Gardner, the impetus for Marking Our Place in the World came from a tree—festooned with shoes—beside U.S. Highway 50 in Nevada. After photographing it he started digging through his car for his own piece of footwear that he could add—and then he stopped, not really understanding why he’d experienced that odd impulse. He is interested in that impulse and its result as applied to the landscape. Gardner says: “As humans we must communicate – it is what we do best. Why are we compelled to ‘leave our mark’ upon landscape, whether or not others understand its meaning or semiology?”

 

Exquisite Earth is an extraordinary collection of works by photographer Stephen Johnson, one of the original masters of digital photography. These dramatic images were created in Antarctica, the Galapagos Islands, Iceland, the American West, and elsewhere. “The grouping," says Johnson, "... is meant to convey my deep appreciation for this extraordinary planet we call home.”

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Viewpoint Photographic Art Center is the proud recipient of a SMAC Cultural Arts Award grant.




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