Past Exhibits

  • Click image or title to view
  • Donald Satterlee and Michael Dunlavey: Italia Bella

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Apr. 4 to Saturday, May. 6
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Apr. 7
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Apr. 8
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Please join us for a special Artists Reception and Fundraiser on Friday, April 7, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

    Guests will enjoy an array of Italian appetizers, luscious desserts, wine and beverages and live music. 

    Tickets ($20) may be purchased online at the Viewpoint Store, or at the door.

    There will also be a drawing ($5 per ticket, 5 for $25, 30 for $100). Prizes include: Bella Italia donated prints by Donald Satterlee and Michael Dunlavey and two gift certificates for 3 half-day Viewpoint Workshops of your choice.

    In April, Viewpoint presents a stunning exhibit of images by Donald Satterlee and Michael Dunlavey entitled: Italia Bella.

    Michael Dunlavey has been enthralled with Italy for a long time. He is drawn to the rich patina, textures, and reflections found at every turn in the backstreets and canals of Venice. Whether shooting intimate details or capturing the power and magnificence of ancient buildings, the contours of century old vinyards, or the landscapes of Tuscany, Chianti, and Umbria, he has created lasting images that convey the haunting beauty of the country. “Searching for something new to shoot on early morning walks energizes all my senses and makes me feel alive.”

    Donald Satterlee’s images were taken in Venice, Tuscany, and many small villages around Northern Italy. In 2008 Satterlee started a personal project entitled Fogscapes. “Shooting photos on a drizzly foggy morning is a very peaceful and ethereal experience. It is my hope that viewing the images conveys that peace and calm.” After researching when Italy was most likely to have fog, Donald made two trips there in January in 2013 and 2014. “There were very few tourists, and securing a room was easy and better yet, several mornings were very foggy.” In an effort to create an “old postcard” feel, many photos have been converted to black and white, split toned, then textures and faint borders composited over the images.

  • Frank Francis: Luminous Journeys—Old Asian Rivers

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Apr. 4 to Saturday, May. 6
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Apr. 7
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Apr. 8
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    In April, member photographer, Frank Francis shares his private view of Southeast Asia through a series of story telling images, which are both emotionally compelling and stunning in composition. His process includes seeking out remote places, which provide access to people who are not so much a part of our modern digital world, who therefore tend to react differently to the camera. He finds capturing the right moment easier when people have been minimally exposed to other photographers.

    Frank Francis says, “My goal is to seek lives within lives, the undertones, the fragments of lives bathed in mystery—an exceedingly difficult task. Another goal is to combine light, composition and moment to tell a story with truth and some drama in it. The long trips on waterways in Assam, Bangladesh, and Myanmar have allowed a silent platform to witness the unchanged rhythms of lives where daily tasks can take on memorable beauty enhanced by the water and the sky. Another goal has been to photograph the intensity and beauty of spiritual life often amplified by transcendence and symbolism.”

  • Kendall Isotalo: Quietude

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Mar. 7 to Saturday, Apr. 1
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Mar. 10
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Mar. 11
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Kendall Isotalo’s body of work Quietude examines the emotional space that can occur during a time when a perceived threat of loss and transition coexists with feelings of gratitude and hope. She has found that in his attempts to be fully present and aware, she is able to experience profound moments of stillness, quiet, and tranquility.

    Isotalo’s photography is about capturing the balance and difference between moments that she perceives as tranquil and mysterious, versus those she finds more melancholy or uncertain. “I’ve always been aware of how these two very different ways of perceiving and responding can trigger emotions on a multi dimensional level,” she says. “I’m also interested in negative space in the sense of what is invisible or unknown and how that can create imaginary or altered realities. I combine old family photos, as well as other photos that I may find at thrift stores, with new images, placing myself in most of them. I use old images not as a way of staying stuck in the past, but rather as a way of honoring, understanding and preserving it. In many ways, I feel that I’m breathing new life into old photographs, keeping the past alive.”

  • Sara Friedlander: Birds of Im/Migration

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Mar. 7 to Saturday, Apr. 1
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Mar. 10
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Mar. 11
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Sara Friedlander has created a series of three-dimensional mixed media visual narratives to honor courageous women, who left their homeland and their families, often under great duress, and traveled to America to start a new life. Most of them spoke no English; holding steadfast to their hopes for a brighter future, they faced daunting challenges in order to establish themselves in this new world. She has collected vintage portraits as well as images in the public domain (taken either in photographic studios or on the street during the first quarter of the 1900's) and then, using Photoshop, digitally combined them with her own photographs (landscapes, birds, trees, architecture) and tied them together with paint.

  • Jan Cordova Manzi: A Personal View

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Mar. 7 to Saturday, Apr. 1
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Mar. 10
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Mar. 11
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Jan Manzi enjoys photographing a range of man-made and natural subjects — often abstracting or isolating them in a way to bring attention to things that might not ordinarily be noticed. As she says, “I find myself responding to the wonderful play of light and shadow that can transform the appearance of a building, a forgotten object, a plant, or a rock.” Sometimes the results are a bit quirky, which can cause viewers to say “what is that?”… followed by surprise at how there can be a quiet beauty in so much that surrounds them, if they only take a little time to look and see.

    Jan Manzi first became interested in photography in college when she was able to learn the basics of working in a traditional darkroom and photographing a wide range of subjects. She began large format work after attending her first photography workshop, the Owens Valley Photography Workshop with Ray MacSavaney, John Sexton and Bruce Barnbaum as instructors. Inspired by the work of the instructors and Brett Weston, who welcomed participants to his home, Jan began to see things differently. Using a view camera helped her slow down and to pay more attention to how light can change textures and shapes. Most of Manzi’s work is with a 4x5 view camera and some with a 6x7 medium format camera.

  • Grounded: The Street Photography of Casey LeClair and John Hernandez

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Feb. 7 to Saturday, Mar. 4
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Feb. 10
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Feb. 11
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Street photographers Casey LeClair and John Hernandez share the Main Gallery for this candid and striking exhibit of street photography. Casey’s images are in black and white, contrasted by John's color photos. Together they provide a broad spectrum of what street photography can be. Each photographer has a distinct style and way of looking at their surroundings. From the ironic to the gritty, this exhibit offers a slice of reality from two distinctly different viewpoints.

  • Mark Coggins: Street Scenes Around the World

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Feb. 7 to Saturday, Mar. 4
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Feb. 10
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Feb. 11
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Mark Coggins is both an author and photographer.  His images have been used to illustrate his own novels as well as the books of other writers, notably Patricia Cornwell’s Red Mist (end papers) and Roland Barthes’s A Lover's Discourse: Fragments (cover photograph). Most of his photographs are street scenes from cities throughout the world. “I seek to capture people interacting or engaged in a representative activity,” he says. “I hope my work conveys the energy, communal bonds, and in some cases, inherent mystery and alienation of urban life.”

    Originally, Coggins used photography to document places he wanted to describe in his books. Then he hit upon the idea of including the photos he was taking in the books. Later, he began to alter the plot of his books to have an excuse to include photos he liked that didn’t have a reference to an existing scene. Now he “moves fluidly between writing and photography, doing both pretty much at the same time.”

    Look at his image Zoltar Gets a Shove.  Why is the woman in the photograph pushing the fortune-telling machine through the street?  What brought her to that instant in her life? If Zoltar were to talk, what would he say? These are questions that the viewer asks and then finds herself creating a story to explain.  Coggins’s images portray more than just an instant in time. Somehow, with his writer’s sensibility, he is able to capture a moment that evokes a bigger story—a story redolent with humor and compassion.

  • Don Manderson: Simultaneity

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Jan. 10 to Saturday, Feb. 4
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Jan. 13
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Jan. 14
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    The term that most accurately describes Don Manderson’s current work is Simultaneity. This refers to the simultaneous and insistent nature of the daily sensory experience in an increasingly technical society. This phenomenon is exemplified by society’s constant efforts to leverage the human capacity for concurrent processing of a range of sensory stimuli within social interaction, advertising, entertainment and journalism. Simultaneity is employed in Don's digital montage and video pieces for delivery of personal commentary and aesthetic expression in a manner congruent with the observer’s daily sensory experience.

  • Bill Schwab — Detroit: Where We Used To Live

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Jan. 10 to Saturday, Feb. 4
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Jan. 13
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Jan. 14
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Utility wires span fields where a neighborhood disappeared. Gutters and garbage pile knee high in front of a burnt-out duplex. A fire hydrant serves a lonely house on a city block. The residential streets of Detroit are in the midst of rapid change with no end in sight. At night, photographer Bill Schwab travels areas in a fast state of flux, finding large swathes of ruralization and deterioration against a backdrop of skies dramatic in color and mood. Street lights, porch lights, window lights, bridge lights, moonlight shine quietly. During the day, the most aggressive blight removal program in the nation bulldozes its way up and down the streets. In its tracks: ghosts of what was and a spirit that hangs on.

  • Twelve: It's About Time

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Wednesday, Dec. 7 to Saturday, Jan. 7
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Dec. 9
    5:30 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Dec. 10
    5:30 pm to 9:00 pm

    This year marks Viewpoint Gallery’s 25th anniversary. For this milestone year Viewpoint’s annual juried exhibit, TWELVE, invites submissions that express the relationship between photography and time. Time, of course, is in photography’s tools. Shutter speeds that split a second into amazingly small fractions and “B” – the 19th century carry over abbreviation that puts the photographer in control of the length of time the shutter is open. Time is also in the language used to express photography’s ideas like the much sought “decisive moment” and memories that are held suspended in time like visual fossils. Time for photography is the frozen collision of the instant and also the on-going ooze of long exposures of traffic or wind or the Milky Way. In fact, all photographs are time exposures of longer or shorter durations. Photography is the record of seasons, growth, decay, memories, the past always present yet always past, and dreams. And what of the time spent planning a photograph, then waiting, watching. Or the time after making the initial exposures spent editing, combining, reimagining. Chair time. Time is certainly ever present in photography. This year's TWELVE: It’s About Time.

    ► Click here to view and purchase images

  • Hans Gindlesberger: I'm in the Wrong Film

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Wednesday, Nov. 9 to Saturday, Dec. 3
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Nov. 11
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Nov. 12
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Hans Gindlesberger's exhibit I’m in the Wrong Film is a consideration of our troubled relationship to the marginal places that exist in the national landscape. The title of the series is a colloquialism used to indicate a speaker’s disorientation in regard to physical surroundings that have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of staged and performative photographs, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, in articulating the collective loss of identity that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

    Presented as a constellation of narrative fragments, each photograph manifests the shared psychology between a transient character and constructed environments suggestive of Middle America. The character, wandering with alternating senses of desire and reticent detachment amid his surroundings, is an extension of a place no longer able to sustain itself.

  • Ingrid Lundquist—Hola Baja: The Texture of the Place, the Heartbeat of its People

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Wednesday, Nov. 9 to Saturday, Dec. 3
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Nov. 11
    6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Nov. 12
    5:00 pm to 9:00 pm

    Saying “hola” (‘greetings’ in Spanish) causes your face muscles to move upward in an openly welcoming manner. “Baja” is the land of the beating sun where dust clings to your body like a cheap price sticker and the colors vibrate to distract you from the surrounding hardships. Ingrid Lundquist’s images capture the inner strength of the people as they go about their daily lives, under challenging circumstances, in a less than pristine environment. Hola Baja speaks to the rich texture of this land and the spirit of its people

  • Roxanne Bull: The Spirit of Women Warriors

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Oct. 4 to Friday, Nov. 4
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Oct. 7
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Oct. 8
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    Probably for the majority of people the word warrior evokes images of the male gender. Yet throughout history women have been thrust into positions of leadership and conflict, rising to the challenge, either alongside men as equals, or in many cases, even better than their male counterparts. Generally it has been men who have written the histories of the world. The heroic actions of women, with rare exceptions, have been inadvertently or intentionally omitted or diminished.

    This photographic project seeks to remind all of us that what makes a warrior is inner spirit and strength, not outward gender. Rocky Bull’s subjects are not new heroes, but instead individuals from history who deserve to be recognized alongside and with the same reverence as their male counterparts.  “The photographs of the women that I have chosen are not meant to be imitation portraits of the real persons involved as the actual figures are long deceased. Rather, my work is intended to invoke the collective as well as the unique aspects of the warrior spirit of each of the women shown.”

  • Collectors Edition 2016: Exhibit and Auction

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Oct. 4 to Friday, Nov. 4
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Oct. 7
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Oct. 8
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    Silent Auction Party: Saturday Nov. 5, 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Details and tickets here.

    Featuring an exhibit of carefully selected prints from Viewpoint’s personal collection as well as donations by some of the country's most noted photographers.

    The October exhibit at Viewpoint Photographic Art Center in the Main Gallery will include an extensive display of the prints available for purchase at Viewpoint's annual Art Auction Fundraiser and Exhibition—entitled Collectors Edition 2016. Prints from local, regional, national, and international photographers will be exhibited, bid on, and sold in this year’s Auction.

    Visit the Auction Event Page for full details on this event, including a link to the on-line Store, which houses the gallery of images that will be for sale at the event on November 5th from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

    The annual auction of fine art photography is the centerpiece of Viewpoint’s fundraising efforts, enabling the organization to continue to build its outreach, education and exhibit programs.

    Artists who have prints included in this year’s auction include: Wynn Bullock, Roman Loranc, Ruth Bernhard, Mark Citret, Charles Farmer, Gordon Hutchings, Gene Kennedy, Roberta Bailey, John Hennessy, Ryuijie, Joan Gentry, John Wimberley, and many more. All images will be online in the Viewpoint Store by mid-September.

     

  • Judy Yemma: Farm to Studio

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Sep. 6 to Friday, Sep. 30
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Sep. 9
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Sep. 10
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    The concept for Judy Yemma's project, Farm to Studio, is built on her interest in creating studio portraits of organic subjects.  Flowers were first.  Currently, her interest is in photographing plant-based edibles in unique and unexpected compositions.  More than mere food items in the produce department or in her garden, she finds fruit and vegetables to be complex and beguiling.  "When I look, I see their personalities. I see their relationships to human qualities.  Fruits and vegetables have remarkable lines, color, texture, and character—offering possibilities for conveying emotional qualities (including humor) and for compositions out of the ordinary."

  • Malcolm Easton: Keepsakes of Strangers

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Sep. 6 to Friday, Sep. 30
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Sep. 9
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Sep. 10
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    Malcolm Easton's project Keepsakes of Strangers derives from his visits to estate sales at homes of the recently deceased. He focuses on the humbler possessions left behind. These objects—typically stained, dusty or patched—carry hints of their connections to the everyday lives of their owners. Malcolm selects some of these things to be photographed. Working with natural light in his studio, he finds that illumination can bring new life to items that might otherwise seem outworn. He also explores juxtapositions that allow objects to relate to each other in unexpected ways. These inspirations lead him to create small monuments, temporary memorials to the people who handled these objects and kept them close for many years. Using sunlight reflected by a hand-held mirror, he photographs his subjects in isolation. In so doing he intends the images to have one foot in the world of light and another in the void. His intention is to address themes of loss and transformation.

  • Francine Moskovitz: Now and Then—A Retrospective

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Sep. 6 to Friday, Sep. 30
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Sep. 9
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Sep. 10
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    At the age of 91, Francine Moskovitz looks back over her 40 years as an enthusiastic photographer and says, “My journey has been adventurous. I’ve gone from underwater cameras, to single lens reflexes, to digital cameras.” Her work has included painting and sandwiching slides, weaving photographs with Mylar, producing double images with a reflective glass pane, and presently, manipulating and combining digital images. This exhibit follows a photographer’s path from the 1970s to the present, with excerpts from numerous portfolios.

    Francine Moskovitz became involved with photography first by joining her husband in scuba diving.  She loved the undersea world and reveled in trying to capture on film the corals and tropical fish. From the ocean she moved to a swimming pool and after much experimenting, ended up photographing nudes, “which brought me my first attention as a photographer!”

    Around the time she moved past underwater photography, Photoshop became available, and it opened up a whole new range of possibilities for her.  “Since then,” she says, “every photograph I do is re-worked in Photoshop—sometimes a little, sometimes changed into a new image, or completely re-made into a composite of several photos. Working on photographs at the computer for several hours a day has become a way of life for me.”

  • The National Park Service—100 Years: California Dreaming

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Aug. 9 to Friday, Sep. 2
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Aug. 12
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Aug. 13
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    In August 2016 the U.S. National Park Service turns 100. This exhibit celebrates 100 years of the beauty and diversity brought to us by our National Park system. For this exhibit we focus on California, with inspirational work by three photographers. Each artist will display some of their finest landscape work for a captivating exhibit of several of California's National Parks. Our coast and ocean and the Point Reyes area are represented by Geoff Delanoy's exhibit, Point Reyes—Fugitive Landscapes. Our mountains are represented by Darvin Atkeson’s images of Yosemite in his exhibit, Capturing Yosemite. California's desert will be represented by Michael E. Gordon in his exhibit, Desert Study.

     

  • Student Exhibit: National Treasures

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Monday, Aug. 8 to Friday, Sep. 2
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Aug. 12
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Aug. 13
    4:30 pm to 8:00 pm

    In celebration of the National Park Service's 100-year anniversary, Viewpoint Photographic Art Center has invited all high school and college students of photography and students in Viewpoint Workshops to submit photographs taken in national or state parks or other protected lands for an exhibit in the Viewpoint Step Up Gallery. 

    This exhibit, entitled National Treasures, runs from August 9 through September 3, 2016. It will coincide with an exhibit in Viewpoint's Main Gallery featuring images from Yosemite National Park, Point Reyes National Seashore, and Death Valley National Park by three prominent photographers.

    IMPORTANT DATES FOR ENTRANTS TO REMEMBER:

    May 7 Entry period begins
    July 16 Entry period ends at 5:00 p.m.
    July 18 Entries juried for acceptance
    July 19 Photographers notified of acceptance by Viewpoint
    July 30 Accepted entries due at Viewpoint

    August 9 National Treasures exhibit opens at noon
    August 12 Members and Artists Reception, 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
    August 13 Second Saturday Reception, 5:30 to 9:00 p.m.

    September 3 Exhibit closes at 5:00 p.m.
    September 6 First day to pick up unsold prints
    December 10 Last day to pick up prints.

    ► Entrants may still DOWNLOAD THE PROSPECTUS for additional important details on submitting  images, print sizes, labeling, selling  work and the agreement between the artist and the Gallery.

    Thank you for your participation!

  • Silver Anniversary Members' Exhibit

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Jul. 5 to Friday, Aug. 5
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Jul. 8
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Jul. 9
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    The annual Members' Exhibit provides an opportunity to both acknowledge the valuable contributions of our membership, and to exhibit their truly outstanding artwork. This year will be no exception as Viewpoint presents 100 images by its membership. Both the Main Gallery and Step Up Galley will be dedicated to the exhibit. All artwork submitted is new to the gallery and exhibits a wide range of style, format and execution.

     

  • Helmut Schillinger: A Different View of Haiti | Jane Schreibman: Littoral Legacies

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Jun. 7 to Friday, Jul. 1
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Jun. 10
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Jun. 11
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    Helmut Schillinger: A Different View of Haiti
    Helmut Schillinger arrived in Haiti with a naive sense and desire for tropical allure and adventure. He got more than he wished for, the good as well as the bad. Many of his European values were turned upside down, but the misery and poverty that he encountered were often balanced by a natural beauty and a different kind of wisdom that he was taught by the largely illiterate rural population. Schillinger says, "I let you the viewer of my images decide whether what I found and photographed contributes to the view of a still largely African world. Someone said once that Haiti today still has more of the original African lifestyle than Africa now."

    Jane Schreibman: Littoral Legacies
    Jane Schreibman's photographs were taken by the Arabian Sea, where it touches the shores along Mumbai — here the masses give way endless space.  The sea is thick with dreams; they float on the water, churn through the waves, and end up as mysterious objects on the shore, packages wrapped in palm leaves, bouquets of orange marigolds, or fragments of the Gods. Young girls wander the sands looking for golden cloths and bracelets released to the sea as the Goddesses disintegrate, strange entities emerge from the tides. Walking along this shore is haunting.

     

  • When the Hummingbird Froze and the Still Forest Leaped into Action

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Jun. 7 to Friday, Jul. 1
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Jun. 10
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Jun. 11
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    Cathy Summa-Wolfe: Hummingbirds: A Flash Ahead of Creation

    Cathy Summa-Wolfe's photographs of hummingbirds were taken over several months, always at sunset, on the porch of her ranch home in the hills of San Juan Bautista, California. "After observing their antics for several weeks," says Cathy, "I noticed that the hummers were often more animated as night fell, when they fought each other to get to the last drops of nectar. Most often depicted as spritely flower garden companions, hummingbirds have a distinctly darker and somewhat menacing side. Beautiful and fierce, these tiny flying jewels soon became compelling subjects. I have printed them on metallic paper, to capture their natural iridescence, and in large format, so that the viewer might have a more intimate experience with them."

    Larry Brenden: Expressions

    Larry Brenden’s ‘Expressions’ are more about feeling the image than about seeing it. By pushing the boundaries of photography they are meant to express a mood or feeling rather than show a subject with infinite detail. Expressive images use the camera in non-traditional ways that can give the images a painterly or abstract quality. Some of the effects used to create the photographs include camera motion with slow shutter speeds, multiple exposures, special lenses, and selective de-focus techniques. The images are printed using minimal adjustments in Lightroom and Photoshop.

  • Douglas Herr: Wildlife Explored

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, May. 10 to Friday, Jun. 3
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, May. 13
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, May. 14
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    Wildlife photographer Douglas Herr seeks partnership with the animals he photographs. He spends the time needed to allow an animal to become comfortable in his presence. This allows the animal to relax and often allows him to use use shorter lenses than are customary for wildlife photography. This in turn allows in the photograph a sense of the animal's preferred habitat. In the ideal photograph, the animal is fully aware of and comfortable with his presence.

  • Four Generations of Weston: Black and White — Edward • Brett • Kim • Zach

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Apr. 5 to Friday, Jun. 3
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Apr. 8
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Apr. 9
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    Q: How do you turn $5,000 into $10,000?
    A: Through a generous anonymous donation!

    Viewpoint has been given $5,000 and challenged to match it. This will bring a total of $10,000 to Viewpoint. This match offer will run to the end of the Weston exhibit, which closes June 4th. You can donate online or at the gallery.

    Thank you for supporting Viewpoint and the art of photography!


    Edward Weston once wrote:

    My work-purpose, my theme, can most clearly be stated as the recognition, recording and presentation of the interdependence, the relativity if all things – the universality of basic form . . . In a single day’s work within a radius of a mile, I might discover and record the skeleton of a bird, a blossoming fruit tree, a cloud, a smokestack; each of these being only a part of the whole, but each – in itself – becoming a symbol of the whole, of life.

    This unequaled vision of photography resonates throughout Edward Weston’s work and that of his family who continue an artistic legacy that remains vibrant today.

    In the work of Brett Weston, we see a deep contemplation of form and through his classic sharp focused contrast we are witness to a master of abstraction.

    In the photography of Kim Weston we see generations of photographic acumen and tradition and a versatile style which becomes adaptable and transcendent to every subject, nude, and setting.

    In the images of Zach Weston we are able to witness a new perspective in abstraction formed from the intuitive Weston ability to present a subtle story in profound ways which honor his family’s legacy yet looking intently to the future.

     

     

  • Adrienne Sher: Underwater

    Exhibit Dates: 
    Tuesday, Apr. 5 to Friday, May. 6
    Artist Reception (Member Event): 
    Friday, Apr. 8
    5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
    2nd Saturday Opening (General Public): 
    Saturday, Apr. 9
    4:00 pm to 8:00 pm

    In the past two decades, Adrienne Sher has divided her time, artistically, between photography and theatre.  "I find that the two disciplines complement each other very well," she says. "Theater is verbal, collaborative and interactive with the public.  Working in the darkroom or at the computer is quiet, solitary and meditative.  I find the more I learn about photography, the more I exchange ideas and techniques with other photographers, the more engrossed I become, and passionate to learn more."

    Sher is particularly drawn to vintage cameras and archaic film formats, small and large.  "I love alternative processes, hand printing, wet paper, the smell of the chemicals, the brushes and glass rods." The images in Underwater are an attempt to capture some of the romance of the hand-processed print using digital tools. All of the images in Underwater are Archival Pigment Inkjet Prints.

Pages

Thank you to our sponsors!


Kenneth Meyers, Robert W. Baird & Co.
Platinum Sponsor

 




Individual Sponsorships
(Luminance Level & Above)

Diane Tempest

J.B. Jones

Shop on Amazon? Use this link to support us while shopping!

 

Connect with us on Facebook!